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From Saturday 9th of April we will be hosting an exhibition from “Friends of Pskov” in the Fair Maid’s House Visitor Centre.

Pskov is a town in Russia that has been twinned with Perth and as such we are very much looking forward to hosting some of the fantastic images taken of Pskov over the years. Our Collections Team have helpfully put together some geographical facts about Pskov and Perth, this blog post is the full version of an abridged article that appeared in our March Eblast, you can sign up for the Eblast from our home page.

THE TWINNED CITIES

Their geographical backgrounds

The positioning of the original settlements of Pskov and Perth has been instrumental in influencing their respective histories and development. Both are sited on what may be termed ”˜natural gateways’ and thus places in the past where different peoples and cultures met, mingled and sometimes strove.

They are also not dissimilar in terms of degrees of latitude north of the Equator, Perth being at 56.39° N and Pskov just over one degree further north at 57.49° N, though the warm currents of the Gulf Stream, wrapping Scotland’s coastline, render Perth’s climate much less severe in winter.

PSKOV, an ancient Russian city, situated some 300 kilometres from St Petersburg, and a similar distance from Riga, the capital of Latvia, and Tallinn, the capital of Estonia, lies in the extreme north-west of the Russian Federation, just 50 km from the current borders of the European Union, on a readily-defensible site at the confluence of two rivers, which lead via a series of lakes to the Gulf of Finland and thence via the Baltic Sea and the waters of the Kattegat and Skagerrak to the North Sea.

PERTH, an ancient capital of Scotland, and gateway to the Scottish Highlands, has easy, natural avenues of communication passing through in all directions on land, and until the late-19th century was the lowest bridging point over the River Tay and also readily accessible by water. Lying at the tidal limit of the Firth of Tay, it was a flourishing port with strong North Sea trading links and retains an active working harbour. It can also claim in geographical terms to lie at the heart of mainland Scotland.